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The Women of Wakanda

The message of “Black Panther” is that the potential and influence of women must not be ignored or discounted. From the strategic actions of Nakia as an undercover spy and refugee saviour on a personal mission who will not abandon her calling, to the knowledge centre of Shuri, who has the final words of the film when she says to the injured Westerner Sergeant Barnes, “Come, there is much more for you to learn,” all the women excel as examples of depth and variety of the Black woman.

Cinema Femme Holiday Gift Guide

Happy holidays from the staff at Cinema Femme magazine! If you’re still looking for gift ideas for the film aficionados, women in film, or just awesome people in your life, here are some of our favorite gifts.

Launch Party photos!

Thank you all who came out last tonight to our launch at the Music Box Theatre! Here are some photos for the event. If you have any photos you took that you’d like to add, let us know!

Reason for the Cinema Femme Movement

Statistics about Female Film Critics A September 2018 report from Dr. Stacy L. Smith and the USC Annenberg Inclusion Initiative (and conducted with Time’s Up Entertainment) used reviews of 300 top-grossing films from 2015–2017 posted on Rotten Tomatoes to assess gender and race/ethnicity of critics, including […]

Superman Is Just For Kids

It took the rest of the Lisbon girls a little while longer to learn, but not much longer. Lux mostly got the lesson from Trip. Waking up to find you’ve been abandoned in the middle of a football field is a harsh way to wake up, in more ways than one, but her excursions to the roof solidified the knowledge. In the iconic shot of her with her cigarette, staring into nothing, there’s a coldness in her eyes that we hadn’t seen before, that only shows up in a girl’s face after she’s learned that she’s on her own.

Enchanted by the Details

I don’t know about you, but I get chills by the intimacy of the details. Her films vary in story, but no matter what the story is about—a seventeenth-century queen, spoiled teenagers in Hollywood, a middle-aged celebrity traveling in Tokyo—I know that I’m going to be enchanted by the artistry of the cinematic details that bring me deeper.

A conversation between Cinema Femme founder Rebecca Martin and film critic Pamela Powell

I met film critic Pamela Powell through Twitter. She had taken a video of actress Gugu Mbatha-Raw’s Q&A after the screening of her film “Fast Color” (directed by Julia Hart) at the Chicago Critics Film Festival. Her praise for Gugu drew me to her as a critic. I retweeted her post, and the rest is history. Months later, I’m so happy to get the opportunity to interview her and share her story.